Anglais, les faux amis (false cognates ou false friends) PDF

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Dans l’apprentissage de l’anglais, les faux-amis sont un chapitre obligatoire. En effet, ces mots qui existent en langue française constituent un réel piège pour les anglophiles en herbe : leur signification en anglais n’a souvent rien à voir avec leur signification en français. Illustrés de nombreux exemples traduits, cette fiche a pour objectif de présenter les principaux faux amis afin de vous éviter certaines erreurs souvent commises par les Français et d’enrichir son vocabulaire.

Relevant discussion may be found on the talk page. False friends are words in two languages that look or sound similar, but differ significantly in meaning. The term originates from a book by French linguists describing the phenomenon, which was translated in 1928 and entitled, « false friend of a translator ». As well as producing completely false friends, the use of loanwords often results in the use of a word in a restricted context, which may then develop new meanings not found in the original language.

False friends, or bilingual homophones are words in two or more languages that look or sound similar, but differ significantly in meaning. This section does not cite any sources. False friends can cause difficulty for people who might interpret a foreign text incorrectly. Students learning a foreign language, particularly one that is related to their native language, also have difficulty with false friends because students are likely to identify the words wrongly due to linguistic interference.