Merriam-Webster’s Easy Learning French in a Click PDF

Jump to navigation Jump to search This article is about the order of merriam-Webster’s Easy Learning French in a Click PDF. The octopus is a soft-bodied, eight-limbed mollusc of the order Octopoda.


Octopuses appear in mythology as sea monsters like the Kraken of Norway and the Akkorokamui of the Ainu, and probably the Gorgon of ancient Greece. A Giant Pacific octopus at Echizen Matsushima Aquarium, Japan. The head includes the mouth and brain. The skin consists of a thin outer epidermis with mucous cells and sensory cells, and a connective tissue dermis consisting largely of collagen fibres and various cells allowing colour change. Most of the body is made of soft tissue allowing it to lengthen, contract, and contort itself. The interior surfaces of the arms are covered with circular, adhesive suckers.

The suckers allow the octopus to anchor itself or to manipulate objects. Each sucker is usually circular and bowl-like and has two distinct parts: an outer shallow cavity called an infundibulum and a central hollow cavity called an acetabulum, both of which are thick muscles covered in a protective chitinous cuticle. A finned Grimpoteuthis octopus of the suborder Cirrina with its atypical octopus body plan. The eyes of the octopus are large and are at the top of the head. They are similar in structure to those of a fish and are enclosed in a cartilaginous capsule fused to the cranium. Some species differ in form from the typical octopus body shape. Members of the suborder Cirrina have stout gelatinous bodies with webbing that reaches near the tip of their arms, and two large fins above the eyes, supported by an internal shell.